the-beginning-of-mean-streets:

Cat Stevens in 70s

the-beginning-of-mean-streets:

Cat Stevens in 70s

courtneywirthit:

i forgot i made this a few months ago and never shared it. it was part of a GIF story that i haven’t finished.
one day…!

courtneywirthit:

i forgot i made this a few months ago and never shared it. it was part of a GIF story that i haven’t finished.

one day…!

(Kaynak: whenspeakingof)

seeamyplay:

Mr Mojo Risin <3

seeamyplay:

Mr Mojo Risin <3

lawlesshellion:

In which the boys from Queen act like adorable little trolls.

deardarkness:

Julian Casablancas : On what inspired The Strokes

(Dutch TV interview, July 2001)

What a beautiful picspam


Rita Hayworth, 1944

Rita Hayworth, 1944

(Kaynak: sharontates)

Absolution 1/2

(Kaynak: h-e-l-i-u-m3)

mirallegrosnico:

I will practice believing my husband l o v e s me but I could be w r o n g


When I reached a certain level of achievement in scriptwriting, Yama-san (Kajiro Yamamoto) told me to start editing. I already knew that you can’t be a film director if you can’t edit. Film editing involves putting on the finishing touches. More than this, it is a process of breathing life into the work…
I learned a mountain of things about editing from Yama-san, but I think the most vital among them is the fact that when you are editing you must have the intelligence to look at your own work objectively… no matter how much work the director, the assistant director, the cameraman or the lighting technicians put into a film, the audience never knows. What is necessary is to show them something that is complete and has no excess. When you are shooting, of course, you film only what you believe is necessary. But very often you realize only after having shot it that you didn’t need it after all. You don’t need what you don’t need. Yet human nature wants to place value on things in direct proportion to the amount of labor that went into making them. In film editing, this natural inclination is the most dangerous of all attitudes. The art of the cinema has been called an art of time, but time used to no purpose cannot be called anything but wasted time. Among all the teachings of Yama-san on film editing, this was the greatest lesson.
— Akira Kurosawa | Something Like an Autobiography

When I reached a certain level of achievement in scriptwriting, Yama-san (Kajiro Yamamoto) told me to start editing. I already knew that you can’t be a film director if you can’t edit. Film editing involves putting on the finishing touches. More than this, it is a process of breathing life into the work…

I learned a mountain of things about editing from Yama-san, but I think the most vital among them is the fact that when you are editing you must have the intelligence to look at your own work objectively… no matter how much work the director, the assistant director, the cameraman or the lighting technicians put into a film, the audience never knows. What is necessary is to show them something that is complete and has no excess. When you are shooting, of course, you film only what you believe is necessary. But very often you realize only after having shot it that you didn’t need it after all. You don’t need what you don’t need. Yet human nature wants to place value on things in direct proportion to the amount of labor that went into making them. In film editing, this natural inclination is the most dangerous of all attitudes. The art of the cinema has been called an art of time, but time used to no purpose cannot be called anything but wasted time. Among all the teachings of Yama-san on film editing, this was the greatest lesson.

Akira Kurosawa | Something Like an Autobiography

(Kaynak: kurosawa-akira)

(Kaynak: robertdeniro)

(Kaynak: h-e-l-i-u-m3)